​Smart Africa returns – with a focus on Rwanda


Rwandan President Paul Kagame (center) and Minister Jean Philbert
Nsengimana (left) work with children during the recent
“Smart Rwanda Days” conference in Kigali.

“Smart” is in. So is digital. According to President Paul Kagame of Rwanda, “digital innovation has leveled the playing field, making it easy for anyone from anywhere can compete in the global economy. Today, ideas do not have borders and therefore countries cannot be landlocked.”

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Top 4 Ways ICTs Can Help Defeat the Ebola Crisis

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is increasingly becoming an international crisis. Recently the World Health Organization counted 5,843 cases of Ebola patients and 2,811 deaths. Even more tragic, the number deaths occurring outside hospitals are not usually recorded, meaning the numbers could actually be significantly higher. The CDC (US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) predicts there if we don’t do anything to stop Ebola in its tracks, the world will have 1.4 million cases before we hit February 2015.

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Time for Africa to increase its contribution to space economy – Pandor

The African continent had to move away from being a “client” in terms of accessing scientific information to rather having customers coming to the continent to access its information, Science and Technology Minister Naledi Pandor said on Monday. Speaking at the opening of the tenth African Association of Remote Sensing of the Environment conference, in Johannesburg, the Minister noted that while Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries still dominated the space economy, times were changing.
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Does the design and implementation of proven innovations for delivering basic primary health care services in rural communities fit the urban setting: the case of Ghana’s Community-based Health Planning and Services (CHPS).

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Does the design and implementation of proven innovations for delivering basic primary health care services in rural communities fit the urban setting: the case of Ghana’s Community-based Health Planning and Services (CHPS).

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Collaborative entrepreneurship and the fostering of entrepreneurialism in developing countries

Collaborative entrepreneurship and the fostering of entrepreneurialism in developing countries
Vanessa Ratten
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2014) pp. 137 – 149
The purpose of this paper is to consider collaborative entrepreneurship and its relevance to entrepreneurialism in developing countries. The paper provides some background to the role of collaboration in society including how individuals, businesses and organisations interact with governments to encourage economic and society activity in developing country economies. The academic literature on collaborative entrepreneurship is examined with an emphasis on entrepreneurialism to try and understand how entrepreneurship is conducted in developing countries. The determinants of collaborative entrepreneurship are stated with the key themes being individual level, social networks, institutional factors, community nature and international experience. The paper comments on a proposed collaborative entrepreneurship research agenda, which contributes to the entrepreneurship literature by illustrating how collaborative entrepreneurship and entrepreneurialism are adapted and used in developing countries to suit the social and market conditions.

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Pursuing job creation, citizen engagement and government efficiency through ICTs in Nigeria


Nigeria’s Ministry of Communication Technology is
advancing a wide range of ICT initiatives,
​including a National Broadband
Development Plan. 

Nations cannot be competitive, innovate and generate tomorrow’s jobs without technology and digitally literate citizens. Similarly, organizations like the World Bank cannot achieve their objectives without fully utilizing the power and potential of technology. Here at the World Bank, we’re striving to reduce the extreme poverty rate to no more than three percent and boost income growth of the world’s poorest 40 percent by 2030. These goals cannot be achieved without fully embracing the transformative powers of technology and innovation.  

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Connectivity equals opportunity: PPPs narrow the "broadband gap"


A billboard announces the arrival of high-speed broadband internet
in downtown Nukua’lofa, the capital of Tonga. Photo: Tom Perry / World Bank

You don’t need to be a grandparent or even have a particularly long memory to recall a time when information and communications technology (ICT) devices were luxuries only a few could afford, if not something lifted entirely from the pages of science fiction. Reform of the ICT sector happened fast, both in broadband and mobile, and we all feel it in our personal and professional lives. The extraordinarily rapid uptake of mobile telephony in developing countries is the most compelling element of the
ICT story, but it’s only partly about the technology itself.

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SA needs more inclusive innovation environment

South Africa’s current innovation landscape was based on exclusivity, preventing ordinary citizens from participating in this space, National Advisory Council on Innovation (Naci) policy investigation senior specialist Dr Ntsane Moleleki said on Friday at a National Science and Technology Forum plenary session. Moleleki said the country’s citizens possessed significant indigenous knowledge systems that could be used to develop new business ideas, stating, however, that these businesses would find it difficult to secure funding in the current innovation environment.
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Technology Questions Every CMO Must Ask

Marketers today encounter a mind-boggling array of technologies. CMOs I talk to are swamped by meeting requests from technology vendors, and most feel an acute pressure to climb on the tech bandwagon. But they worry about the massive distraction of full-scale technology assessments—and about the risk of buying expensive tools that don’t live up to their potential.

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Expanding the Mobile Apps Market: Making Mobile Work at the Base of the Pyramid

Arne Hoel/The World Bank

The diagram of a horizontally sliced triangle, with its wide base and pointy tip, has been used to represent socio-economic data for decades. The lowest and largest portion represents the poorest and most populous segment of society – living “at the bottom of the pyramid.” In the context of mobile innovation, we prefer the alternate term, “base of the pyramid,” which is closer to signifying the foundational, fundamental role of this demographic group in the health of an economy.

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The Most Innovative Companies Don’t Worry About Consensus

Consensus is a powerful tool. When CEOs set out to conquer new markets or undertake billion-dollar acquisitions, we’d hope they’d at least sought out some consensus from their trusted advisors. We hope they’d be as sure as possible that their teams are ready, that their strategies are sound, and that they’d done their diligence.

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Guiding the development of family medicine training in Africa through collaboration with the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.

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Guiding the development of family medicine training in Africa through collaboration with the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.

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Community-based education programs in Africa: faculty experience within the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) network.

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Community-based education programs in Africa: faculty experience within the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) network.

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