Expanding the Mobile Apps Market: Making Mobile Work at the Base of the Pyramid

Arne Hoel/The World Bank

The diagram of a horizontally sliced triangle, with its wide base and pointy tip, has been used to represent socio-economic data for decades. The lowest and largest portion represents the poorest and most populous segment of society – living “at the bottom of the pyramid.” In the context of mobile innovation, we prefer the alternate term, “base of the pyramid,” which is closer to signifying the foundational, fundamental role of this demographic group in the health of an economy.

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Perceptions of success of a social entrepreneurship initiative: a cross-cultural management approach

Perceptions of success of a social entrepreneurship initiative: a cross-cultural management approach
Kristina Henricson Briggs
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2014) pp. 122 – 136
Entrepreneurship is often linked to economic growth and is increasingly popular as a tool for economic development. However, entrepreneurship and cross-cultural management in Africa is still an under researched area. This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of how different perceptions of a fruitful project are a key aspect in the management of social entrepreneurship projects. It reports on a Swedish social entrepreneurship initiative in Uganda which was longitudinally studied from 2007 to 2010. Data was collected during field studies and interviews. The conclusion points at the fact that the interpretation of the results is influenced by the cross-cultural management perspective of the interpreter and easily follows the same ethnocentric pattern that we try to avoid when formulating projects. Those findings could be applied in similar projects anywhere in the world.

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Innovation Capabilities for Sustainable Development in Africa

A sustainable pathway for Africa in the twenty-first century is laid out in the setting of the development of innovation capabilities and the capture of latecomer advantages. Africa has missed out on these possibilities in the twentieth century while seeing the East Asian countries advance. There are now abundant examples and cases to draw on, in the new setting where industrial development has to have green tinges to be effective.

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Collaborative entrepreneurship and the fostering of entrepreneurialism in developing countries

Collaborative entrepreneurship and the fostering of entrepreneurialism in developing countries
Vanessa Ratten
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2014) pp. 137 – 149
The purpose of this paper is to consider collaborative entrepreneurship and its relevance to entrepreneurialism in developing countries. The paper provides some background to the role of collaboration in society including how individuals, businesses and organisations interact with governments to encourage economic and society activity in developing country economies. The academic literature on collaborative entrepreneurship is examined with an emphasis on entrepreneurialism to try and understand how entrepreneurship is conducted in developing countries. The determinants of collaborative entrepreneurship are stated with the key themes being individual level, social networks, institutional factors, community nature and international experience. The paper comments on a proposed collaborative entrepreneurship research agenda, which contributes to the entrepreneurship literature by illustrating how collaborative entrepreneurship and entrepreneurialism are adapted and used in developing countries to suit the social and market conditions.

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Pursuing job creation, citizen engagement and government efficiency through ICTs in Nigeria


Nigeria’s Ministry of Communication Technology is
advancing a wide range of ICT initiatives,
​including a National Broadband
Development Plan. 

Nations cannot be competitive, innovate and generate tomorrow’s jobs without technology and digitally literate citizens. Similarly, organizations like the World Bank cannot achieve their objectives without fully utilizing the power and potential of technology. Here at the World Bank, we’re striving to reduce the extreme poverty rate to no more than three percent and boost income growth of the world’s poorest 40 percent by 2030. These goals cannot be achieved without fully embracing the transformative powers of technology and innovation.  

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Technology Questions Every CMO Must Ask

m4s0n501

Marketers today encounter a mind-boggling array of technologies. CMOs I talk to are swamped by meeting requests from technology vendors, and most feel an acute pressure to climb on the tech bandwagon. But they worry about the massive distraction of full-scale technology assessments—and about the risk of buying expensive tools that don’t live up to their potential.

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The Most Innovative Companies Don’t Worry About Consensus

Consensus is a powerful tool. When CEOs set out to conquer new markets or undertake billion-dollar acquisitions, we’d hope they’d at least sought out some consensus from their trusted advisors. We hope they’d be as sure as possible that their teams are ready, that their strategies are sound, and that they’d done their diligence.

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Guiding the development of family medicine training in Africa through collaboration with the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.

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Guiding the development of family medicine training in Africa through collaboration with the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.

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Community-based education programs in Africa: faculty experience within the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) network.

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Community-based education programs in Africa: faculty experience within the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) network.

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Denel group launches new South African aircraft project

South African aerospace companies Denel Aerostructures (DAe) and Denel Aviation, both part of the State-owned Denel Group, have unveiled a major new project – the South African Regional Aircraft (SARA). This is aimed at meeting a gap in the global market, preserving South Africa’s aerospace design and development capabilities, while also stimulating the country’s young aerospace engineers and technicians.
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Physics in SA faces great opportunities and major challenges

In South Africa, the science of physics is today caught in a situation of paradox. “For physics in South Africa, it’s the best of times and the worst of times,” asserts South African Institute of Physics (SAIP) President Prof Irvy "Igle" Gledhill. “We have tremendous projects, such as the biggest radio telescope in the world, and at the same time we have a crisis in education. We have to handle both things at the same time.”
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Japan seeks to deepen educational, training and research ties with SA

Japan is working with a number of South African tertiary educational institutions, including the Tshwane University of Technology, to set up at least one Human Resources Development Centre in this country. At the TICAD V summit in June last year, Japan promised to create ten such centres across Africa. (TICAD stands for Tokyo International Conference on African Development; it was launched in 1993 and is held every five years.)
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University for Women Key to African Agriculture

“ARU was incubated by the Uganda Rural Development and Training Program (URDT), a non-governmental organization (NGO) founded in 1987. It is the first African university dedicated to training women.  It is one of the first African universities to be incubated by a rural NGO and show great promise in the potential for growth among local organizations. ARU is one the first universities to focus on rural development and entrepreneurship considering that Africa is largely rural.”

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Screening for start-up potential in universities and research institutions – or how to map invisible innovation potentials

Screening for start-up potential in universities and research institutions – or how to map invisible innovation potentials
Fritjof Karnani; Reinhard Schulte
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 12, No. 1/2/3 (2013) pp. 62 – 77
The discussion about spin-offs from the public research sector is generally limited to the case where findings of a research project are brought to market by scientists within the scope of a company start-up. This perception does not do justice to the start-up scene or the start-up potential of public research. The majority of scientific start-ups use knowledge beyond research findings, starting companies in the shadow of publications by academic institutions and drawing from the realm of tacit knowledge at universities. The method of cognitive mapping allows us to systematically access the tacit exploitation potentials of research institutions, which is the prerequisite for potential exploitation.

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Corporate culture and the adverse impact of cultural differences on technology transfer

Corporate culture and the adverse impact of cultural differences on technology transfer
Thi Duc Nguyen Nguyen; Atsushi Aoyama
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 12, No. 1/2/3 (2013) pp. 22 – 42
This study aims to determine the mechanism through which corporate culture produces potential advantages by efficiently minimising the impact of cultural differences on technology transfer performance. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation modelling (SEM) multigroup analysis are used to analyse structured survey data from 223 Japanese manufacturing subsidiaries in Vietnam. The results indicate that when a company places greater value on learning, encouraging staff to participate in the decision-making process, transmitting accurate and timely internal and external information about business operations, accepting risk, promoting cooperation, and readily offering help, it achieves efficient technology transfer with reduced negative impact from cultural differences during the implementation process. These findings could offer insights to address the intracultural, intercultural, and transcultural innovation management practice issues faced by local and international executives.

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