International technology transfer: innovative quantitative tools

International technology transfer: innovative quantitative tools
Houssam Eddine Bessam; Rainer Gadow
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 12, No. 1/2/3 (2013) pp. 78 – 101
International technology transfer (ITT) including transfer of knowledge and technology between companies in industrialised countries and their partners in developing countries is not necessary always successful. This work based on the experiences of professionals from North African countries (Egypt and Algeria) is an effort to build mathematical models encompassing all project stages using the existing success/failure factors of technology transfer from the literature review as input variables in order to predict the performance of ITT projects as an output and to determine a set of best practices. The gathered data about realised projects were exploited for developing linear, nonlinear models using conventional statistical approaches and also fuzzy models. These models should be seen as complementary rather than as rivals. They allow not only the prediction of an ITT project performance but also may help for a better understanding of ITT process. The performance of an ITT project in this study is a set of five success dimensions for e.g. success at the macro level and success in short term at the level of the company. These dimensions are conflicting because the increase of one success could lead to decrease in another. Therefore the use of multi-objective optimisation theory was necessary in order to determine the optimum of Pareto offering a good combination of them. ACADO toolkit and MOEA framework were used in this study for calculating the optimum of Pareto.

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Innovation Capabilities for Sustainable Development in Africa

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A sustainable pathway for Africa in the twenty-first century is laid out in the setting of the development of innovation capabilities and the capture of latecomer advantages. Africa has missed out on these possibilities in the twentieth century while seeing the East Asian countries advance. There are now abundant examples and cases to draw on, in the new setting where industrial development has to have green tinges to be effective.

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South Africa emerges as leading global nuclear medicine supplier

Nuclear medicine is defined by the Department of Medical Physics of the School of Clinical Medicine of the University of the Witwatersrand as “a speciality that makes use of radioactive tracers that emit gamma rays to assess the physio- logical functioning of organs and systems in the body”. These radioactive tracers are called radio- pharmaceuticals. The US-based but international Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging explains: “[In] nuclear medi- cine imaging, the …
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Collaborative entrepreneurship and the fostering of entrepreneurialism in developing countries

Collaborative entrepreneurship and the fostering of entrepreneurialism in developing countries
Vanessa Ratten
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2014) pp. 137 – 149
The purpose of this paper is to consider collaborative entrepreneurship and its relevance to entrepreneurialism in developing countries. The paper provides some background to the role of collaboration in society including how individuals, businesses and organisations interact with governments to encourage economic and society activity in developing country economies. The academic literature on collaborative entrepreneurship is examined with an emphasis on entrepreneurialism to try and understand how entrepreneurship is conducted in developing countries. The determinants of collaborative entrepreneurship are stated with the key themes being individual level, social networks, institutional factors, community nature and international experience. The paper comments on a proposed collaborative entrepreneurship research agenda, which contributes to the entrepreneurship literature by illustrating how collaborative entrepreneurship and entrepreneurialism are adapted and used in developing countries to suit the social and market conditions.

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Pursuing job creation, citizen engagement and government efficiency through ICTs in Nigeria


Nigeria’s Ministry of Communication Technology is
advancing a wide range of ICT initiatives,
​including a National Broadband
Development Plan. 

Nations cannot be competitive, innovate and generate tomorrow’s jobs without technology and digitally literate citizens. Similarly, organizations like the World Bank cannot achieve their objectives without fully utilizing the power and potential of technology. Here at the World Bank, we’re striving to reduce the extreme poverty rate to no more than three percent and boost income growth of the world’s poorest 40 percent by 2030. These goals cannot be achieved without fully embracing the transformative powers of technology and innovation.  

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Can Open Data boost economic growth and prosperity?

What interventions are needed by governments – and by the World Bank – to stimulate and support the realization of the economic benefits of Open Data for everyone?  How do we prioritize what kind of data is needed?  These were some of the simmering questions that were posed at last Wednesday’s World Bank Live event.  A collaborative effort among World Bank global practices and units – Transport and Information & Communications Technologies (ICT), the Development Data Group (DECDG), Open FinancesExternal and Corporate Relations, and others – this global policy dialogue event served as an opportunity to listen in on leading experts explaining and debating the latest evidence of the economic benefits of Open Data and how it can be applied to advance socioeconomic growth in the developing world.

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LynkMii Launches Global Online Business Directory.

An international, online business directory called LynkMii has been launched, offering members the opportunity to post free listings of companies on their website. Designed for Apple and Android devices, the service enables businesses to use the website, mobile-site and native apps to bring their goods, services and promotions to millions of users and potential customers.

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Feeding Africa: Why Biotechnology Sceptics are Wrong to Dismiss GM

“Genetically-modified (GM) crops or any other breeding methods on their own cannot solve the challenges related to food quality, access to food, nutrition or stability of food systems. But their role cannot be dismissed for ideological reasons.”

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Technological Leapfrogging in Agriculture

“To harness the globally available technologies, African leaders will need to take into account the multisectoral dimension of African agriculture and pay particular attention to the urgency of investing in rural infrastructure, higher agricultural training and creation of regional markets.”

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Technology transfer and innovation: exploring the multifaceted nature of this interaction

Technology transfer and innovation: exploring the multifaceted nature of this interaction
Barbara Bigliardi; Francesco Galati; Giuliano Marolla; Chiara Verbano
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 12, No. 1/2/3 (2013) pp. 1 – 7
A key component in the success of industrial firms is the extent of their innovativeness. In recent decades, as a result of intense international competition, fragmented and demanding markets and rapidly changing technologies, companies are more and more recognising the importance of the ‘technology transfer’ process to benefit from the innovations introduced into the market. Moving from this increasing importance attributed to the technology transfer, the purpose of this special issue is to shed light on the main issue related to this matter. We begin this introductory paper by providing a brief overview of some theoretical reasons underlying the undeniable relevance of technology transfer for both companies and the society as a whole. We then introduce the six papers that are included in the special issue, thus revealing their respective contributions and their advancement of existing knowledge.

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How do Indonesian industries perceive university-industry collaboration? Motivations, benefits and problems

How do Indonesian industries perceive university-industry collaboration? Motivations, benefits and problems
NuruI Indarti; Fathul Wahid
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 12, No. 1/2/3 (2013) pp. 157 – 171
This study examines university-industry collaboration from the industry perspective. From a survey of 32 firms engaged in university-industry joint research funded by the Indonesian Government, we found various motivations to set up joint research with universities. These included accessing new ideas, getting involved in relevant research and accessing available research funding. A variety of benefits were enjoyed by industry, such as accessing new ideas and know-how from the university, improving product and process development, advancing the ability to provide better information to consumers/suppliers and improving R&D activities. However, industry partners perceived that their allocated investments did not pay off as expected and they were in doubt about the applicability or commercialisation potential of the research output. The findings also indicated that researchers were less likely to base research on the real problems faced by industry, but rather from an a priori perception or ideas they had in mind. Finally, recommendations were also provided.

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Please share your ideas on how Open Data can help eradicate rural poverty

We’d like to hear your ideas of how Open Data could be used to help eradicate poverty and improve public services in rural India.We are launching a co-creation and crowdsourcing effort on “Open Data Solutions for Rural Development and Inclusive Growth in Andhra Pradesh and Telangana.” This is linked to an ideation workshop on September 4 in Hyderabad, which will bring together key stakeholders from these two Indian States, including government officials, development practitioners, health, education, agriculture, retail and other subject matter experts, entrepreneurs, ICT firms, and academic and research institutions.

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Social entrepreneurship and institutional environment in an emerging economy

Social entrepreneurship and institutional environment in an emerging economy
Vishal Vyas; Sonika Raitani; Vidhu K. Mathur
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2014) pp. 106 – 121
Social entrepreneurship in India has progressed significantly over the last decade. Social entrepreneurs – those who bring an entrepreneurial approach to solving social problems – are a growing breed in India. There is a lack of studies related to social entrepreneurship in literature. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the association between the institutional environment and social entrepreneurial self-efficacy. Based on the existing literature and theories, we have first proposed a model, and then empirically tested it using the structural equation modelling technique. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire from a sample of 284 entrepreneurial students of Rajasthan based on quota sampling. Analysis resulted that regulatory, normative and cognitive environment positively influence the social entrepreneurial self-efficacy. Results suggested that financial assistance, social legitimacy and acknowledgement are the most important factors necessary to enhance the growth of social entrepreneurship in India. Training is vital to create a pool of social entrepreneurs.

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The Chief Innovation Officer’s 100-Day Plan

Congratulations! Your energy and track record of successfully launching high-impact initiatives scored you a plum role heading up innovation. Expectations are high, but some skeptics in the organization feel that innovation is an overhyped buzzword that doesn’t justify being a separate function. So, what can you do in your first 100 days to set things off on the right track?

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The Science of Social Impact Innovation: How to Deliver More Impact through Innovative Business Models

Rather than spend an inordinate amount of time and resources on planning what is inherently unknown and uncertain, socially-focused organizations like Panera Cares, Banco Davivienda, and Brigham Young University’s (BYU) Design Exploration lab quickly map out their assumptions, run experiments to test those assumptions, and adjust their plans based on their learnings. In this article, we explain and expand on how organizations of all kinds (whether they be large corporations, social ventures, or government agencies) have bought into the idea of using innovation and experimentation for impact; and how despite recent advancements of design thinking on the social impact front, the actual implementation of innovative ideas remains elusive for many organizations. The article further presents a more systemic model for social impact innovation: social impact models, which provide one possible solution by enabling social ventures to achieve a more robust validation of their new- and not-so-new-to-the-world ideas by mapping and strategies by mapping out each assumption and iteratively testing them in the field. With this article, the authors seek to provide a practical process for how to apply the model, and how to avoid the most common illusory validation traps, which together would allow socially-focused organizations to more frequently succeed and deliver more impact with their endeavors.

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The Innovation Funnel Fallacy

The traditional innovation process – consisting of a funnel coupled with project screening – suffers from several practical shortcomings and flaws. Overemphasis on the role of early stages, such as idea generation, overshadows subsequent phases of equal importance. The drive to feed as many ideas as possible into the funnel may cause congestion that slows down overall progress. Furthermore, the yield may be of low quality if ineffective gates allow too many infertile ideas to pass through the funnel. Processes may be inflexible and slow to react, especially if tied to the corporate planning calendar as often proposed. This is not to imply that these problems are inherent; they are instead the consequences of poor practices.

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