Perceptions of success of a social entrepreneurship initiative: a cross-cultural management approach

Perceptions of success of a social entrepreneurship initiative: a cross-cultural management approach
Kristina Henricson Briggs
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2014) pp. 122 – 136
Entrepreneurship is often linked to economic growth and is increasingly popular as a tool for economic development. However, entrepreneurship and cross-cultural management in Africa is still an under researched area. This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of how different perceptions of a fruitful project are a key aspect in the management of social entrepreneurship projects. It reports on a Swedish social entrepreneurship initiative in Uganda which was longitudinally studied from 2007 to 2010. Data was collected during field studies and interviews. The conclusion points at the fact that the interpretation of the results is influenced by the cross-cultural management perspective of the interpreter and easily follows the same ethnocentric pattern that we try to avoid when formulating projects. Those findings could be applied in similar projects anywhere in the world.

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International technology transfer: innovative quantitative tools

International technology transfer: innovative quantitative tools
Houssam Eddine Bessam; Rainer Gadow
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 12, No. 1/2/3 (2013) pp. 78 – 101
International technology transfer (ITT) including transfer of knowledge and technology between companies in industrialised countries and their partners in developing countries is not necessary always successful. This work based on the experiences of professionals from North African countries (Egypt and Algeria) is an effort to build mathematical models encompassing all project stages using the existing success/failure factors of technology transfer from the literature review as input variables in order to predict the performance of ITT projects as an output and to determine a set of best practices. The gathered data about realised projects were exploited for developing linear, nonlinear models using conventional statistical approaches and also fuzzy models. These models should be seen as complementary rather than as rivals. They allow not only the prediction of an ITT project performance but also may help for a better understanding of ITT process. The performance of an ITT project in this study is a set of five success dimensions for e.g. success at the macro level and success in short term at the level of the company. These dimensions are conflicting because the increase of one success could lead to decrease in another. Therefore the use of multi-objective optimisation theory was necessary in order to determine the optimum of Pareto offering a good combination of them. ACADO toolkit and MOEA framework were used in this study for calculating the optimum of Pareto.

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Innovation Capabilities for Sustainable Development in Africa

A sustainable pathway for Africa in the twenty-first century is laid out in the setting of the development of innovation capabilities and the capture of latecomer advantages. Africa has missed out on these possibilities in the twentieth century while seeing the East Asian countries advance. There are now abundant examples and cases to draw on, in the new setting where industrial development has to have green tinges to be effective.

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Collaborative entrepreneurship and the fostering of entrepreneurialism in developing countries

Collaborative entrepreneurship and the fostering of entrepreneurialism in developing countries
Vanessa Ratten
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2014) pp. 137 – 149
The purpose of this paper is to consider collaborative entrepreneurship and its relevance to entrepreneurialism in developing countries. The paper provides some background to the role of collaboration in society including how individuals, businesses and organisations interact with governments to encourage economic and society activity in developing country economies. The academic literature on collaborative entrepreneurship is examined with an emphasis on entrepreneurialism to try and understand how entrepreneurship is conducted in developing countries. The determinants of collaborative entrepreneurship are stated with the key themes being individual level, social networks, institutional factors, community nature and international experience. The paper comments on a proposed collaborative entrepreneurship research agenda, which contributes to the entrepreneurship literature by illustrating how collaborative entrepreneurship and entrepreneurialism are adapted and used in developing countries to suit the social and market conditions.

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Pursuing job creation, citizen engagement and government efficiency through ICTs in Nigeria


Nigeria’s Ministry of Communication Technology is
advancing a wide range of ICT initiatives,
​including a National Broadband
Development Plan. 

Nations cannot be competitive, innovate and generate tomorrow’s jobs without technology and digitally literate citizens. Similarly, organizations like the World Bank cannot achieve their objectives without fully utilizing the power and potential of technology. Here at the World Bank, we’re striving to reduce the extreme poverty rate to no more than three percent and boost income growth of the world’s poorest 40 percent by 2030. These goals cannot be achieved without fully embracing the transformative powers of technology and innovation.  

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LynkMii Launches Global Online Business Directory.

An international, online business directory called LynkMii has been launched, offering members the opportunity to post free listings of companies on their website. Designed for Apple and Android devices, the service enables businesses to use the website, mobile-site and native apps to bring their goods, services and promotions to millions of users and potential customers.

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Japan seeks to deepen educational, training and research ties with SA

Japan is working with a number of South African tertiary educational institutions, including the Tshwane University of Technology, to set up at least one Human Resources Development Centre in this country. At the TICAD V summit in June last year, Japan promised to create ten such centres across Africa. (TICAD stands for Tokyo International Conference on African Development; it was launched in 1993 and is held every five years.)
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University for Women Key to African Agriculture

“ARU was incubated by the Uganda Rural Development and Training Program (URDT), a non-governmental organization (NGO) founded in 1987. It is the first African university dedicated to training women.  It is one of the first African universities to be incubated by a rural NGO and show great promise in the potential for growth among local organizations. ARU is one the first universities to focus on rural development and entrepreneurship considering that Africa is largely rural.”

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Screening for start-up potential in universities and research institutions – or how to map invisible innovation potentials

Screening for start-up potential in universities and research institutions – or how to map invisible innovation potentials
Fritjof Karnani; Reinhard Schulte
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 12, No. 1/2/3 (2013) pp. 62 – 77
The discussion about spin-offs from the public research sector is generally limited to the case where findings of a research project are brought to market by scientists within the scope of a company start-up. This perception does not do justice to the start-up scene or the start-up potential of public research. The majority of scientific start-ups use knowledge beyond research findings, starting companies in the shadow of publications by academic institutions and drawing from the realm of tacit knowledge at universities. The method of cognitive mapping allows us to systematically access the tacit exploitation potentials of research institutions, which is the prerequisite for potential exploitation.

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Corporate culture and the adverse impact of cultural differences on technology transfer

Corporate culture and the adverse impact of cultural differences on technology transfer
Thi Duc Nguyen Nguyen; Atsushi Aoyama
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 12, No. 1/2/3 (2013) pp. 22 – 42
This study aims to determine the mechanism through which corporate culture produces potential advantages by efficiently minimising the impact of cultural differences on technology transfer performance. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation modelling (SEM) multigroup analysis are used to analyse structured survey data from 223 Japanese manufacturing subsidiaries in Vietnam. The results indicate that when a company places greater value on learning, encouraging staff to participate in the decision-making process, transmitting accurate and timely internal and external information about business operations, accepting risk, promoting cooperation, and readily offering help, it achieves efficient technology transfer with reduced negative impact from cultural differences during the implementation process. These findings could offer insights to address the intracultural, intercultural, and transcultural innovation management practice issues faced by local and international executives.

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The Future of AngularJS

sextantAngularJS, for me, was a revelation the first time I encountered it. I was coming from using GWT (Google Web Toolkit), and seeing our large application shrink in lines of code by 90% was close to a spiritual experience. I was a convert from day one, because I knew how bad things were otherwise. Ever since, I have been associated with AngularJS in one way or another, and have seen how it makes things absolutely simple with data binding, templating, routing, unit testing, and so much more. But the more I used it, some things didn’t make sense, from naming to concepts. I got the hang of it, but I never really got to like why directives needed to be so complex, or how the built-in routing was quite limiting. While AngularJS made it trivial to write applications, it also made it trivial to write slow, hard-to-maintain applications if you didn’t understand how it all worked together. Read more

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What every Java developer needs to know about Java 9

What every Java developer needs to know about Java 9Java 8 may only have been released a few months ago, but Oracle has already announced the first set of features that will be targeted for Java 9. On August 11th, Mark Reinhold, a Chief Architect for Java, made available an initial feature set to subscribers on the jdk9-dev mailing list.

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Feeding Africa: Why Biotechnology Sceptics are Wrong to Dismiss GM

“Genetically-modified (GM) crops or any other breeding methods on their own cannot solve the challenges related to food quality, access to food, nutrition or stability of food systems. But their role cannot be dismissed for ideological reasons.”

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Technological Leapfrogging in Agriculture

“To harness the globally available technologies, African leaders will need to take into account the multisectoral dimension of African agriculture and pay particular attention to the urgency of investing in rural infrastructure, higher agricultural training and creation of regional markets.”

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Technology transfer and innovation: exploring the multifaceted nature of this interaction

Technology transfer and innovation: exploring the multifaceted nature of this interaction
Barbara Bigliardi; Francesco Galati; Giuliano Marolla; Chiara Verbano
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 12, No. 1/2/3 (2013) pp. 1 – 7
A key component in the success of industrial firms is the extent of their innovativeness. In recent decades, as a result of intense international competition, fragmented and demanding markets and rapidly changing technologies, companies are more and more recognising the importance of the ‘technology transfer’ process to benefit from the innovations introduced into the market. Moving from this increasing importance attributed to the technology transfer, the purpose of this special issue is to shed light on the main issue related to this matter. We begin this introductory paper by providing a brief overview of some theoretical reasons underlying the undeniable relevance of technology transfer for both companies and the society as a whole. We then introduce the six papers that are included in the special issue, thus revealing their respective contributions and their advancement of existing knowledge.

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How do Indonesian industries perceive university-industry collaboration? Motivations, benefits and problems

How do Indonesian industries perceive university-industry collaboration? Motivations, benefits and problems
NuruI Indarti; Fathul Wahid
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 12, No. 1/2/3 (2013) pp. 157 – 171
This study examines university-industry collaboration from the industry perspective. From a survey of 32 firms engaged in university-industry joint research funded by the Indonesian Government, we found various motivations to set up joint research with universities. These included accessing new ideas, getting involved in relevant research and accessing available research funding. A variety of benefits were enjoyed by industry, such as accessing new ideas and know-how from the university, improving product and process development, advancing the ability to provide better information to consumers/suppliers and improving R&D activities. However, industry partners perceived that their allocated investments did not pay off as expected and they were in doubt about the applicability or commercialisation potential of the research output. The findings also indicated that researchers were less likely to base research on the real problems faced by industry, but rather from an a priori perception or ideas they had in mind. Finally, recommendations were also provided.

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Please share your ideas on how Open Data can help eradicate rural poverty

We’d like to hear your ideas of how Open Data could be used to help eradicate poverty and improve public services in rural India.We are launching a co-creation and crowdsourcing effort on “Open Data Solutions for Rural Development and Inclusive Growth in Andhra Pradesh and Telangana.” This is linked to an ideation workshop on September 4 in Hyderabad, which will bring together key stakeholders from these two Indian States, including government officials, development practitioners, health, education, agriculture, retail and other subject matter experts, entrepreneurs, ICT firms, and academic and research institutions.

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South Africa emerges as leading global nuclear medicine supplier

Nuclear medicine is defined by the Department of Medical Physics of the School of Clinical Medicine of the University of the Witwatersrand as “a speciality that makes use of radioactive tracers that emit gamma rays to assess the physio- logical functioning of organs and systems in the body”. These radioactive tracers are called radio- pharmaceuticals. The US-based but international Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging explains: “[In] nuclear medi- cine imaging, the …
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