Japan seeks to deepen educational, training and research ties with SA

Japan is working with a number of South African tertiary educational institutions, including the Tshwane University of Technology, to set up at least one Human Resources Development Centre in this country. At the TICAD V summit in June last year, Japan promised to create ten such centres across Africa. (TICAD stands for Tokyo International Conference on African Development; it was launched in 1993 and is held every five years.)
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University for Women Key to African Agriculture

“ARU was incubated by the Uganda Rural Development and Training Program (URDT), a non-governmental organization (NGO) founded in 1987. It is the first African university dedicated to training women.  It is one of the first African universities to be incubated by a rural NGO and show great promise in the potential for growth among local organizations. ARU is one the first universities to focus on rural development and entrepreneurship considering that Africa is largely rural.”


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Screening for start-up potential in universities and research institutions – or how to map invisible innovation potentials

Screening for start-up potential in universities and research institutions – or how to map invisible innovation potentials
Fritjof Karnani; Reinhard Schulte
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 12, No. 1/2/3 (2013) pp. 62 – 77
The discussion about spin-offs from the public research sector is generally limited to the case where findings of a research project are brought to market by scientists within the scope of a company start-up. This perception does not do justice to the start-up scene or the start-up potential of public research. The majority of scientific start-ups use knowledge beyond research findings, starting companies in the shadow of publications by academic institutions and drawing from the realm of tacit knowledge at universities. The method of cognitive mapping allows us to systematically access the tacit exploitation potentials of research institutions, which is the prerequisite for potential exploitation.

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Corporate culture and the adverse impact of cultural differences on technology transfer

Corporate culture and the adverse impact of cultural differences on technology transfer
Thi Duc Nguyen Nguyen; Atsushi Aoyama
International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, Vol. 12, No. 1/2/3 (2013) pp. 22 – 42
This study aims to determine the mechanism through which corporate culture produces potential advantages by efficiently minimising the impact of cultural differences on technology transfer performance. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation modelling (SEM) multigroup analysis are used to analyse structured survey data from 223 Japanese manufacturing subsidiaries in Vietnam. The results indicate that when a company places greater value on learning, encouraging staff to participate in the decision-making process, transmitting accurate and timely internal and external information about business operations, accepting risk, promoting cooperation, and readily offering help, it achieves efficient technology transfer with reduced negative impact from cultural differences during the implementation process. These findings could offer insights to address the intracultural, intercultural, and transcultural innovation management practice issues faced by local and international executives.

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Perceptions of success of a social entrepreneurship initiative: a cross-cultural management approach

Perceptions of success of a social entrepreneurship initiative: a cross-cultural management approach
Kristina Henricson Briggs
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2014) pp. 122 – 136
Entrepreneurship is often linked to economic growth and is increasingly popular as a tool for economic development. However, entrepreneurship and cross-cultural management in Africa is still an under researched area. This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of how different perceptions of a fruitful project are a key aspect in the management of social entrepreneurship projects. It reports on a Swedish social entrepreneurship initiative in Uganda which was longitudinally studied from 2007 to 2010. Data was collected during field studies and interviews. The conclusion points at the fact that the interpretation of the results is influenced by the cross-cultural management perspective of the interpreter and easily follows the same ethnocentric pattern that we try to avoid when formulating projects. Those findings could be applied in similar projects anywhere in the world.

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The Future of AngularJS

sextantAngularJS, for me, was a revelation the first time I encountered it. I was coming from using GWT (Google Web Toolkit), and seeing our large application shrink in lines of code by 90% was close to a spiritual experience. I was a convert from day one, because I knew how bad things were otherwise. Ever since, I have been associated with AngularJS in one way or another, and have seen how it makes things absolutely simple with data binding, templating, routing, unit testing, and so much more. But the more I used it, some things didn’t make sense, from naming to concepts. I got the hang of it, but I never really got to like why directives needed to be so complex, or how the built-in routing was quite limiting. While AngularJS made it trivial to write applications, it also made it trivial to write slow, hard-to-maintain applications if you didn’t understand how it all worked together. Read more

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What every Java developer needs to know about Java 9

What every Java developer needs to know about Java 9Java 8 may only have been released a few months ago, but Oracle has already announced the first set of features that will be targeted for Java 9. On August 11th, Mark Reinhold, a Chief Architect for Java, made available an initial feature set to subscribers on the jdk9-dev mailing list.

The crop of features are being run under a relatively new process, known as Java Enhancement Proposals (JEP). This process allows new language and VM features to be prototyped and explored without the full weight of the normal Java standardization process, although the expectation is that suitable, successful JEPs would go on to formal standardization. There will, of course, be many other new features that will be introduced in Java 9, but in this post we are going to focus on two major enhancements — and examine how they relate to features added in Java 7 and 8. Read more

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