The role of trust as mediator between contract, information and knowledge within business incubators

The role of trust as mediator between contract, information and knowledge within business incubators
Benjamin Vedel; Inès Gabarret
International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, Vol. 23, No. 4 (2014) pp. 509 – 527
The relationship between the incubator team and the tenants is very important to the success of the incubation process. A good relationship is based on cooperation and both parties need to be committed (Rice, 2002). From a monitoring point of view, incubator managers can use two mechanisms to build good relationships with their tenants: the contract and trust. We analysed 177 incubated firms using multiple regression analysis and a structural equation methodology. Our results show that trust acts as a mediator between the contract and both information disclosure and knowledge acquisition.

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Toward a balanced framework to evaluate and improve the internal functioning of non-profit economic development business incubators. A study in Belgium

Toward a balanced framework to evaluate and improve the internal functioning of non-profit economic development business incubators. A study in Belgium
Johanna Vanderstraeten; Paul Matthyssens; Arjen Van Witteloostuijn
International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, Vol. 23, No. 4 (2014) pp. 478 – 508
Non-profit organisations, such as economic development incubators, may adapt the balanced scorecard and strategy map in their efforts to improve their internal functioning. In this paper, we employ qualitative research among non-profit economic development incubators in Antwerp, Belgium, to modify these tools. By adapting these frameworks, we extend the current incubator literature where predominantly individual measures (such as tenant survival or the incubator’s occupancy rate) are employed to evaluate incubator performance. Incubator managers and their funding organisations may use our adapted strategy map and balanced scorecard to uncover the incubator’s internal processes that need improvement. The evaluation tools allow them to go beyond the objective and individual performance measures that often are used to evaluate the incubator’s performance. The tools can also be used to benchmark several incubators and help funding organisations to make more informed resource allocation decisions.

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Supporting the open innovation process in small and medium enterprises

Supporting the open innovation process in small and medium enterprises
Gemma Kearney; Lynn-Sayers McHattie
International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, Vol. 23, No. 4 (2014) pp. 552 – 567
Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) encounter specific barriers in engaging in innovation. This paper explores the concept of open innovation and how best conditions conducive to this can be created to support SMEs to engage in innovation. It presents chiasma – innovation workshops – as a method towards a collaborative approach that brings together SMEs, designers and academics. Design in action (DiA) is a knowledge exchange hub, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, which draws together six universities and art schools across Scotland. Adopting a qualitative approach, the paper presents an ongoing process, whereby the approach emerges from action research in conversation with the actors involved.

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A quest for global entrepreneurs: the importance of cultural intelligence on commitment to entrepreneurial education

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A quest for global entrepreneurs: the importance of cultural intelligence on commitment to entrepreneurial education
Marilyn M. Helms; Raina M. Rutti; Melanie Lorenz; Jase Ramsey; Craig E. Armstrong
International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, Vol. 23, No. 3 (2014) pp. 385 – 404
This article extends the management construct of cultural intelligence (CQ) to the entrepreneurship literature by examining CQ in the context of commitment to entrepreneurial education as a proxy for entrepreneurial intentions. Using a convenience sample of students enrolled in an entrepreneurship class, we investigated the relationships of international experience, CQ and commitment to entrepreneurial education. Our findings suggest international experience is positively related to CQ (H1) and CQ is positively related to commitment to entrepreneurial education (H2). Additionally, CQ mediates the relationship between international experience and commitment (H3). This research demonstrates the usefulness of CQ within the entrepreneurial context in the expanding global economy. Discussion and areas for future research focus on further testing of the proposed relationships in other entrepreneurial populations. Also, implications for entrepreneurial training and education related to increasing CQ through study and travel/living/working abroad should be explored.

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Impact of Demographic Factors on Technological Orientations of BOP Entrepreneurs in Ghana

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

The study explores relationship between technological orientations and demographics of bottom of the pyramid (BOP) entrepreneurs in Ghana. The study reviewed literature on the BOP concept. Based on the reviewed literature, hypotheses were developed for testing. Data was collected from 287 micro-entrepreneurs using a structured questionnaire. The data collected was analyzed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression analysis. The study found some relationships between technology acceptance, connectivity to networks and entrepreneurial demographics. This provides the information necessary for information communications technology (ICT) and technology companies seeking to expand to these new markets as top of the pyramid markets saturate.
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The Vital Entrepreneurial Learning Organization: A Corporate Mindset for Entrepreneurial Change Management

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

A globally competitive technology business environment requires a dual perspective for entrepreneurial change management to secure long-term and short-term vitality in mature organizations. Entrepreneurial organizations should shape the environment-organization relation and pursue entrepreneurial activities in new businesses and in existing businesses to integrate efficiency, innovation and adaptation. The presented concept of a vital entrepreneurial learning organization describes a systematic theoretical framework for firm-level entrepreneurship in dynamic environments. The theoretical constructs developed on theoretical exploration are: nine design elements of holistic intrapreneurship, three entrepreneurial tasks and process model, role model for the entrepreneurial organization, conceptual framework of the business environment, qualitative systems model for entrepreneurial change management, and five organizational learning elements. These theoretical building blocks provide new insights into the nature of holistic intrapreneurship.
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Stimulating learning about social entrepreneurship through income generation projects

Abstract

Purpose – This empirical paper examines the use of income generation projects as a pedagogic method to assess students’ learning about social enterprises. We are interested in how and why this innovative approach might improve students’ understanding of the different aspects and attributes of social entrepreneurship.Design/methodology/approach – Our study used thematic analysis of qualitative data comprising the reflective logs of 87 students on an undergraduate entrepreneurship module in a university business programme. The major attributes of social entrepreneurship were identified from a review of literature, and we used the logs to judge whether students had learnt about these attributes.Findings – Our results show that students developed an understanding concerning social enterprises’ diverse stakeholder environment, market needs, social enterprises’ ideological foundations, resource mobilisation processes and performance measurement – both social and financial. In addition, they developed skills in reflection and self-awareness, communication, empathy and the generation of new ideas.Research limitations/implications – Our study is limited in that it focused on only one cohort of students, undergraduates. We cannot claim that our findings are generalisable to other students or contexts. Practical implications – Students are better able to understand the needs and values of social enterprises. However, this is a resource intensive process for educators with implications for curriculum design and management. Originality/value – This study sheds new light on how experiential learning in the form of income generation projects helps to raise students’ awareness of social enterprises. Its value lies in helping to develop a novel and effective pedagogy for entrepreneurial learning
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