How to Make Innovations Business Relevant

Innovations should clearly contribute to growth, optimization and protection of the business. However, CEOs often challenge innovations already at the beginning of respective discussions and huge amounts of ideas get lost, together with prospective business benefits. In this IM Channel One Roundtable Discussion we introduced EY’s way of utilizing innovation management to address the three most relevant board room challenges: top-line growth, bottom-line growth and business resilience.
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Logic alone does not lead to innovation

Logic alone does not confer a competitive advantage and companies must increase collaboration to capture latent potential innovations that will improve the business, says entrepreneurial and innovation consultant Frans Johansson. Expertise is not a sufficient differentiator in the rapidly and continuously changing business landscape because logical, incremental innovations will not be able to respond to or capitalise on fast-moving trends. Innovative ideas are not recognised as logical prior to their acceptance and only appear obvious afterwards.
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Fueling Your Employees’ Entrepreneurial Spirit: A New Approach to Intrapreneurs and the Value They Create

Cast your mind back, to pre-2008 times, when bright and bushy tailed graduates would come out of business school looking for roles in the relevant employers of choice. Generally those organizations were large businesses, providing incentives such as expensive dinners, a career advancement path and generous financial packages.
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Innovation and Production in Manufacturing Industry: a Comparative Study about Global Chains

A new logic in the capitalist accumulation process has emerged in the last four decades. The hypothesis of the article is that this new logic expresses itself in the manufacturing industry through the increasing segmentation of product innovation and product manufacturing activities, and the integration of two alternative types of innovation activities: informational and aesthetic-expressive. Starting from an approach that combines different theoretical categories (global value chain, historical system of accumulation, disconnection between innovation and production capabilities) and a methodology based on the analysis of secondary sources of information, three productive chains have been studied: pharmaceutical, apparel and consumer electronics. The outcome of the research confirms the formulated hypothesis and allows us to detect specificities in the content of innovation, the constitution of entry barriers and the geographical dispersion in each chain.
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Patents for humanity: Special edition of Technology and Innovation

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How universities and government are reaching the next billion people

The current special issue of Technology and Innovation, is devoted to patents that benefit people around the world who live with limited resources, in challenging environments, and are in need of better access to basic needs and improved standards of living, health and infrastructure.

The issue includes original articles from winners of the 2013 USPTO Patents for Humanity Awards, aimed at rewarding innovators for deploying patented technologies to address humanitarian needs. Winners featured in the issue include SIGN Fracture Care International, the University of California, Berkeley and Nokero International Ltd.

Other institutions represented include the University of South Florida (USF); University of Toronto; Institute for Regulatory Science; University of Tennessee Chattanooga, and Technopolis Group Austria on behalf of the European Patent Office. Read more

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Elements of a Successful Innovation Roadmap

Countless articles argue: To remain competitive, companies need to consistently build their innovation portfolio. Value-oriented improvement and new developments must permeate the business. This article discusses a structured approach, known as a Rapid Innovation Cycle, which brings a repeatable process to innovation, empowering individuals to contribute more and organizations to look beyond themselves—all leading to a higher success rate.
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