Perceptions of success of a social entrepreneurship initiative: a cross-cultural management approach

Perceptions of success of a social entrepreneurship initiative: a cross-cultural management approach
Kristina Henricson Briggs
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2014) pp. 122 – 136
Entrepreneurship is often linked to economic growth and is increasingly popular as a tool for economic development. However, entrepreneurship and cross-cultural management in Africa is still an under researched area. This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of how different perceptions of a fruitful project are a key aspect in the management of social entrepreneurship projects. It reports on a Swedish social entrepreneurship initiative in Uganda which was longitudinally studied from 2007 to 2010. Data was collected during field studies and interviews. The conclusion points at the fact that the interpretation of the results is influenced by the cross-cultural management perspective of the interpreter and easily follows the same ethnocentric pattern that we try to avoid when formulating projects. Those findings could be applied in similar projects anywhere in the world.

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Collaborative entrepreneurship and the fostering of entrepreneurialism in developing countries

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Collaborative entrepreneurship and the fostering of entrepreneurialism in developing countries
Vanessa Ratten
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2014) pp. 137 – 149
The purpose of this paper is to consider collaborative entrepreneurship and its relevance to entrepreneurialism in developing countries. The paper provides some background to the role of collaboration in society including how individuals, businesses and organisations interact with governments to encourage economic and society activity in developing country economies. The academic literature on collaborative entrepreneurship is examined with an emphasis on entrepreneurialism to try and understand how entrepreneurship is conducted in developing countries. The determinants of collaborative entrepreneurship are stated with the key themes being individual level, social networks, institutional factors, community nature and international experience. The paper comments on a proposed collaborative entrepreneurship research agenda, which contributes to the entrepreneurship literature by illustrating how collaborative entrepreneurship and entrepreneurialism are adapted and used in developing countries to suit the social and market conditions.

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Social entrepreneurship and institutional environment in an emerging economy

Social entrepreneurship and institutional environment in an emerging economy
Vishal Vyas; Sonika Raitani; Vidhu K. Mathur
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2014) pp. 106 – 121
Social entrepreneurship in India has progressed significantly over the last decade. Social entrepreneurs – those who bring an entrepreneurial approach to solving social problems – are a growing breed in India. There is a lack of studies related to social entrepreneurship in literature. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the association between the institutional environment and social entrepreneurial self-efficacy. Based on the existing literature and theories, we have first proposed a model, and then empirically tested it using the structural equation modelling technique. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire from a sample of 284 entrepreneurial students of Rajasthan based on quota sampling. Analysis resulted that regulatory, normative and cognitive environment positively influence the social entrepreneurial self-efficacy. Results suggested that financial assistance, social legitimacy and acknowledgement are the most important factors necessary to enhance the growth of social entrepreneurship in India. Training is vital to create a pool of social entrepreneurs.

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Social media marketing

Social media marketing
Yoosuf Cader; Afraa Abdulla Al Tenaiji
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 2, No. 6 (2013) pp. 546 – 560
The rapid usage of social media marketing has grown with the corresponding growth in internet bandwidth, technology and mobile devices. 1) Almost 29% give feedback through online questionnaire surveys while 15% said they responded to offline questionnaire surveys. 22% said they use e-mails to give feedback to organisations while 12% used SMS. 2) 52% of the respondents indicated they had not been reached by other organisations via social media networks while 48% said they had been reached. In the latter, 38% started reaching them in 2009 but much less in the years prior to that. The most popular social media sites used for marketing activities are Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Flickr, and Myspace. 3) The marketing activities implemented by organisations in the UAE on social media sites were as follows: to increase brand awareness; advertising; feedback on products or services; promotional offers; directing to the organisations website, and inexpensive reach of potential customers and market intelligence gathering. 4) A large percent (74%) of the respondents did not lodge customer complaints through social media sites but 26% did. A high percent (62) of the latter said their complaints were effectively resolved. The practical implications of these findings are invaluable to marketing managers (see pages 13 and 14).

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Agricultural technology commercialisation: stakeholders, business models, and abiotic stressors – part 2

Agricultural technology commercialisation: stakeholders, business models, and abiotic stressors – part 2
Stephen Suffian; Arianna De Reus; Curtis Eckard; Amy Copley; Khanjan Mehta
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 2, No. 6 (2013) pp. 561 – 577
Innovative agricultural technologies that bolster food value chains (FVCs) in developing countries can improve the livelihoods of millions of people while furthering food security. The first part of this article described a typology of business models that entrepreneurs can employ to integrate their technologies into FVCs. This part completes the typology by describing business models that leverage partnerships with entities like financing agencies, educational institutions, and localised manufacturing facilities to enhance access to the technology product. The impacts of abiotic stressors like access to capital, supply chain resiliency, and ownership dynamics are discussed with the objective of helping entrepreneurs make informed business strategy decisions. The article culminates with a discussion on how various models in the typology can be integrated to yield hybrid approaches that overcome diverse stressors while maximising the venture’s potential for long-term sustainability and large-scale impact.

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Social innovation in dynamic environments: organising technology for temporary advantage

Social innovation in dynamic environments: organising technology for temporary advantage
Sandro Battisti
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 2, No. 6 (2013) pp. 504 – 524
A new challenge for public-private partnerships lies in gaining temporary advantage through social innovation, in order to operate within dynamic environments. This research explores social innovation enabled by technology, in order to build an empirical model that can be useful in addressing social needs of the citizens, while increasing temporary advantages for the companies. This research presents an entrepreneurial approach in which public-private partnerships can organise technology in order to develop and diffuse social innovation within dynamic environments. By employing this model, citizens can be empowered to participate in the joint construction of social innovation enabled by information and communication technology, in particular the phenomenon of shared data. The social entrepreneurship approach enables public-private partnerships to leverage shared data and obtain temporary advantages. This aids in developing innovative solutions to improve quality of life of citizens while it enables companies to succeed in dynamic environments.

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Social entrepreneurship and motivation to start up a business

Social entrepreneurship and motivation to start up a business
Nouha Yangui; Anis Jarboui
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 2, No. 6 (2013) pp. 525 – 545
This study aims to investigate the entrepreneurial determinant and motivation to start up a business in specific groups, namely the disabled, immigrants, and women. The empirical part of this study was based on primary data collected through a heterogeneous sample of 272 Tunisian entrepreneurs. The obtained results support the paper’s first central hypothesis that personal motivation has a positive impact on the motivation of social entrepreneurs in Tunisia. For the second main hypothesis, we found that discrimination has had no effect on the motivation of those entrepreneurs. Moreover, the results demonstrate that personal motivation influences the willingness to create firms. The present study equally attempts to explain the many political implications of these findings, the most important of which consisting in the mobilisation of entrepreneurs to launch their own businesses to develop social entrepreneurship in Tunisia.

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