The Future of AngularJS

sextantAngularJS, for me, was a revelation the first time I encountered it. I was coming from using GWT (Google Web Toolkit), and seeing our large application shrink in lines of code by 90% was close to a spiritual experience. I was a convert from day one, because I knew how bad things were otherwise. Ever since, I have been associated with AngularJS in one way or another, and have seen how it makes things absolutely simple with data binding, templating, routing, unit testing, and so much more. But the more I used it, some things didn’t make sense, from naming to concepts. I got the hang of it, but I never really got to like why directives needed to be so complex, or how the built-in routing was quite limiting. While AngularJS made it trivial to write applications, it also made it trivial to write slow, hard-to-maintain applications if you didn’t understand how it all worked together. Read more

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What every Java developer needs to know about Java 9

What every Java developer needs to know about Java 9Java 8 may only have been released a few months ago, but Oracle has already announced the first set of features that will be targeted for Java 9. On August 11th, Mark Reinhold, a Chief Architect for Java, made available an initial feature set to subscribers on the jdk9-dev mailing list.

The crop of features are being run under a relatively new process, known as Java Enhancement Proposals (JEP). This process allows new language and VM features to be prototyped and explored without the full weight of the normal Java standardization process, although the expectation is that suitable, successful JEPs would go on to formal standardization. There will, of course, be many other new features that will be introduced in Java 9, but in this post we are going to focus on two major enhancements — and examine how they relate to features added in Java 7 and 8. Read more

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Economic Order Quantity Model with Innovation Diffusion Criterion under Influence of Price-Dependent Potential Market Size

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

In last few decades various models developed under inventory control section whether of probabilistic or deterministic nature did not consider the effect of marketing parameters. The marketing parameters especially associated with innovation diffusion theory make the inventory models more realistic. In this paper, an inventory model has been proposed based on the explicit assumptions of interaction of marketing parameters to the optimal inventory replenishment policy. A time-dependent innovation driven demand has been incorporated in the basic economic order quantity (EOQ) model to know the realistic features of the model. This model assumes that potential market size is dynamic over time and is dependent on the price of the product. The model is illustrated with a numerical example and to know the effectiveness of the model a sensitivity analysis of the optimal solution with respect to different parameters has been performed.
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Matching development challenges with tech solutions in the fight against extreme poverty

The goals of multilateral development agencies, United Nations and World Bank Group are laser-focused on the post-2015 development agenda, calling for transformative change by eradicating extreme poverty and raising economic prosperity for all.  This vision for a new era in development is rightly bold and ambitious, but cannot be delivered without fully embracing the transformative power of technology and innovation, including information and communications technology or ICT.

Most would agree that technology solutions exist for most every seemingly intractable problem.  Yet often our greatest challenge is to match the problem with the solution.  In my various “technology for development” and trade promotion roles with the United Nations and World Bank, it is so clearly evident that government leaders know what problems they need to solve, but are simply unaware of the technology solutions available to them. Even the most highly informed development experts are not aware of the technologies being produced for their particular area of expertise, and technology firms are often unaware of the vast and specific challenges developing countries face.

Thus, it is critical to first identify specific, not general challenges in areas such as access to capital, business creation, countrywide connectivity, education and training, employment, environmental protection, government administration, health, housing, hunger, infrastructure, pollution, population growth, trade expansion, waste, water scarcity, and women’s empowerment.  These are but a fraction of problems facing the developing world.

Photo: flickr, courtesy of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (http://ow.ly/zjGTn)

 

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Impact of Demographic Factors on Technological Orientations of BOP Entrepreneurs in Ghana

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

The study explores relationship between technological orientations and demographics of bottom of the pyramid (BOP) entrepreneurs in Ghana. The study reviewed literature on the BOP concept. Based on the reviewed literature, hypotheses were developed for testing. Data was collected from 287 micro-entrepreneurs using a structured questionnaire. The data collected was analyzed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression analysis. The study found some relationships between technology acceptance, connectivity to networks and entrepreneurial demographics. This provides the information necessary for information communications technology (ICT) and technology companies seeking to expand to these new markets as top of the pyramid markets saturate.
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Determinants of Innovation Commercialization Management and Anticipated Returns: An Exploratory Typology of SMEs

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

This paper explores the effects of firm characteristics on the commercialization management and anticipated innovation returns within small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Our results suggest that young and small firms tend to be more innovative and have higher expectation for anticipated returns despite their less systematic management. By contrast, medium-sized firms are more likely to formalize their management, yet they have lower anticipated returns. Small equity-financed firms tend to approach a more systematic management of commercialization and anticipate high returns. Mature firms pursue a less systematic approach and anticipate lower returns. Overall, our findings show that firm characteristics such as size, age, R&D level, type of financing, innovation novelty and protection of intellectual properties play a significant role in the commercialization process. Employing an updated typology, this study provides additional insights into the firms’ commercialization management and sheds some light on the owner-managers’ anticipated returns from innovation.
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The Vital Entrepreneurial Learning Organization: A Corporate Mindset for Entrepreneurial Change Management

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

A globally competitive technology business environment requires a dual perspective for entrepreneurial change management to secure long-term and short-term vitality in mature organizations. Entrepreneurial organizations should shape the environment-organization relation and pursue entrepreneurial activities in new businesses and in existing businesses to integrate efficiency, innovation and adaptation. The presented concept of a vital entrepreneurial learning organization describes a systematic theoretical framework for firm-level entrepreneurship in dynamic environments. The theoretical constructs developed on theoretical exploration are: nine design elements of holistic intrapreneurship, three entrepreneurial tasks and process model, role model for the entrepreneurial organization, conceptual framework of the business environment, qualitative systems model for entrepreneurial change management, and five organizational learning elements. These theoretical building blocks provide new insights into the nature of holistic intrapreneurship.
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