Economic Order Quantity Model with Innovation Diffusion Criterion under Influence of Price-Dependent Potential Market Size

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

In last few decades various models developed under inventory control section whether of probabilistic or deterministic nature did not consider the effect of marketing parameters. The marketing parameters especially associated with innovation diffusion theory make the inventory models more realistic. In this paper, an inventory model has been proposed based on the explicit assumptions of interaction of marketing parameters to the optimal inventory replenishment policy. A time-dependent innovation driven demand has been incorporated in the basic economic order quantity (EOQ) model to know the realistic features of the model. This model assumes that potential market size is dynamic over time and is dependent on the price of the product. The model is illustrated with a numerical example and to know the effectiveness of the model a sensitivity analysis of the optimal solution with respect to different parameters has been performed.
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Matching development challenges with tech solutions in the fight against extreme poverty

The goals of multilateral development agencies, United Nations and World Bank Group are laser-focused on the post-2015 development agenda, calling for transformative change by eradicating extreme poverty and raising economic prosperity for all.  This vision for a new era in development is rightly bold and ambitious, but cannot be delivered without fully embracing the transformative power of technology and innovation, including information and communications technology or ICT.

Most would agree that technology solutions exist for most every seemingly intractable problem.  Yet often our greatest challenge is to match the problem with the solution.  In my various “technology for development” and trade promotion roles with the United Nations and World Bank, it is so clearly evident that government leaders know what problems they need to solve, but are simply unaware of the technology solutions available to them. Even the most highly informed development experts are not aware of the technologies being produced for their particular area of expertise, and technology firms are often unaware of the vast and specific challenges developing countries face.

Thus, it is critical to first identify specific, not general challenges in areas such as access to capital, business creation, countrywide connectivity, education and training, employment, environmental protection, government administration, health, housing, hunger, infrastructure, pollution, population growth, trade expansion, waste, water scarcity, and women’s empowerment.  These are but a fraction of problems facing the developing world.

Photo: flickr, courtesy of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (http://ow.ly/zjGTn)

 

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Impact of Demographic Factors on Technological Orientations of BOP Entrepreneurs in Ghana

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

The study explores relationship between technological orientations and demographics of bottom of the pyramid (BOP) entrepreneurs in Ghana. The study reviewed literature on the BOP concept. Based on the reviewed literature, hypotheses were developed for testing. Data was collected from 287 micro-entrepreneurs using a structured questionnaire. The data collected was analyzed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression analysis. The study found some relationships between technology acceptance, connectivity to networks and entrepreneurial demographics. This provides the information necessary for information communications technology (ICT) and technology companies seeking to expand to these new markets as top of the pyramid markets saturate.
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Determinants of Innovation Commercialization Management and Anticipated Returns: An Exploratory Typology of SMEs

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

This paper explores the effects of firm characteristics on the commercialization management and anticipated innovation returns within small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Our results suggest that young and small firms tend to be more innovative and have higher expectation for anticipated returns despite their less systematic management. By contrast, medium-sized firms are more likely to formalize their management, yet they have lower anticipated returns. Small equity-financed firms tend to approach a more systematic management of commercialization and anticipate high returns. Mature firms pursue a less systematic approach and anticipate lower returns. Overall, our findings show that firm characteristics such as size, age, R&D level, type of financing, innovation novelty and protection of intellectual properties play a significant role in the commercialization process. Employing an updated typology, this study provides additional insights into the firms’ commercialization management and sheds some light on the owner-managers’ anticipated returns from innovation.
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The Vital Entrepreneurial Learning Organization: A Corporate Mindset for Entrepreneurial Change Management

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

A globally competitive technology business environment requires a dual perspective for entrepreneurial change management to secure long-term and short-term vitality in mature organizations. Entrepreneurial organizations should shape the environment-organization relation and pursue entrepreneurial activities in new businesses and in existing businesses to integrate efficiency, innovation and adaptation. The presented concept of a vital entrepreneurial learning organization describes a systematic theoretical framework for firm-level entrepreneurship in dynamic environments. The theoretical constructs developed on theoretical exploration are: nine design elements of holistic intrapreneurship, three entrepreneurial tasks and process model, role model for the entrepreneurial organization, conceptual framework of the business environment, qualitative systems model for entrepreneurial change management, and five organizational learning elements. These theoretical building blocks provide new insights into the nature of holistic intrapreneurship.
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Perceptions of Creativity in University–Industry Partnerships: A Pedagogical Approach

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

Building innovation capability is vital for prosperity and economic growth. The purpose of this study is to determine how innovation and creativity capability can be fostered through partnership between university and industry which is a core component of innovation systems. It compares student and industry perceptions of creativity, with a view to identifying discrepancies that may result in unclear expectations for creative work and hinder efforts to building creative capability. Unlike previous studies that provide a single viewpoint, this study contributes to the innovation and technology management literature by offering a dyadic perspective of both employers and students. Results reflect a shift toward “second generation”, contextual views of creativity. Implications are discussed for formulating pedagogical approaches and managing the development of creativity.
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Interpreting Innovation Dynamics with Complexity Theory

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

Capturing and understanding innovation dynamics is a continuous challenge due to the difficulty of collecting process data and because it often involves multiple levels and units of analysis. Interest has been increasingly focused on applying complexity theory in explaining temporal and nonlinear characteristics of innovation because of its systematic paradigm for examining change in complex systems. Until recently, however, there is relatively little empirical support. This paper fulfills this objective by examining longitudinal data of Nylon innovation. Results reveal an attractor-shifting pattern accompanied by four adaptive cycles in the Nylon innovation process.
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