Lessons from eight countries on diffusing innovation in health care.

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Lessons from eight countries on diffusing innovation in health care.

Health Aff (Millwood). 2014 Sep 1;33(9):1516-22

Authors: Keown OP, Parston G, Patel H, Rennie F, Saoud F, Al Kuwari H, Darzi A

Abstract

Health care systems are under increasing pressure to cope with shifting demographics, the threat of chronic and noncommunicable disease, and rising health care costs. The uptake of innovations to meet these challenges and to advance medicine and health care delivery is not as rapid as the pace of change. Greater emphasis on the diffusion of innovation and greater understanding of the structural and organizational levers that can be used to facilitate systemwide improvement are essential. This article describes the results of a qualitative and quantitative study to assess the factors and behaviors that foster the adoption of health care innovation in eight countries: Australia, Brazil, England, India, Qatar, South Africa, Spain, and the United States. It describes the front-line cultural dynamics that must be fostered to achieve cost-effective and high-impact transformation of health care, and it argues that there is a necessity for greater focus on vital, yet currently underused, organizational action to support the adoption of innovation.

PMID: 25201655 [PubMed - in process]

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Determinants of Innovation Commercialization Management and Anticipated Returns: An Exploratory Typology of SMEs

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International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

This paper explores the effects of firm characteristics on the commercialization management and anticipated innovation returns within small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Our results suggest that young and small firms tend to be more innovative and have higher expectation for anticipated returns despite their less systematic management. By contrast, medium-sized firms are more likely to formalize their management, yet they have lower anticipated returns. Small equity-financed firms tend to approach a more systematic management of commercialization and anticipate high returns. Mature firms pursue a less systematic approach and anticipate lower returns. Overall, our findings show that firm characteristics such as size, age, R&D level, type of financing, innovation novelty and protection of intellectual properties play a significant role in the commercialization process. Employing an updated typology, this study provides additional insights into the firms’ commercialization management and sheds some light on the owner-managers’ anticipated returns from innovation.
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Perceptions of Creativity in University–Industry Partnerships: A Pedagogical Approach

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

Building innovation capability is vital for prosperity and economic growth. The purpose of this study is to determine how innovation and creativity capability can be fostered through partnership between university and industry which is a core component of innovation systems. It compares student and industry perceptions of creativity, with a view to identifying discrepancies that may result in unclear expectations for creative work and hinder efforts to building creative capability. Unlike previous studies that provide a single viewpoint, this study contributes to the innovation and technology management literature by offering a dyadic perspective of both employers and students. Results reflect a shift toward “second generation”, contextual views of creativity. Implications are discussed for formulating pedagogical approaches and managing the development of creativity.
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Interpreting Innovation Dynamics with Complexity Theory

International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, Ahead of Print.

Capturing and understanding innovation dynamics is a continuous challenge due to the difficulty of collecting process data and because it often involves multiple levels and units of analysis. Interest has been increasingly focused on applying complexity theory in explaining temporal and nonlinear characteristics of innovation because of its systematic paradigm for examining change in complex systems. Until recently, however, there is relatively little empirical support. This paper fulfills this objective by examining longitudinal data of Nylon innovation. Results reveal an attractor-shifting pattern accompanied by four adaptive cycles in the Nylon innovation process.
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How Innovation Ecosystems Turn Outsiders into Collaborators

Running a truly innovative company means constantly improving your innovation culture and process. Running a successful innovation ecosystem, however, demands more. Successful innovation ecosystems make people outside the company measurably smarter, richer, and more innovative. Biologically speaking, innovation ecosystems invest in symbiosis, not parasitism. Growth isn’t zero-sum.

Jeff Bezos knows. So do Larry Page and new Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. Mark Zuckerberg, Reed Hastings, Marissa Mayer, and Haier CEO Zhang Ruimin similarly grasp the strategic, operational, and cultural distinction. They’re leaders and entrepreneurs who are publicly committed to creating better ecosystems, not just better products.

While successful innovators reap new profits from new products and services, successful innovation ecosystems cultivate profitability by encouraging others to create valuable new offerings. Their financial futures depend on how innovative they make their customers, clients, channels, and partners. Truly effective ecosystems manage to turn outsiders into de facto collaborators. Enabling external innovation becomes as important as improving one’s own. In fact, successful innovation ecosystems create virtuous cycles of external creativity, which drives internal adaptation. In turn, internal innovation enables and inspires external investment.

Ecosystem innovators like Bezos and Hastings are constantly asking, “Who are we making richer? Who are we making more innovative? Who’s on both those lists?” The answers say everything about the future they’re trying to create.

This is beautifully highlighted by Flipboard cofounder and CEO Mike McCue’s recent comment about how empowering users to create their own “virtual magazines” redefined the reader experience. “It was totally transformative,” he observed. “There are over 7 million magazines that people made in the nine or 10 months since we launched it. It’s awesome.” These customers are now creating virtual magazines, not just reading them. And Flipboard is learning and adapting thanks to their expressive ingenuity.

This is the real IP — not “Intellectual Property” but “Innovation Partnerships.” Look at Amazon Web Services, GitHub, Toyota and YouTube’s investments in suppliers, and Apple’s App Store. Or consider Netflix’s efforts to procure binge-able viewing: With Netflix’s new commissions of series like House of Cards and Orange Is the New Black, creative people are now producing for a Netflix audience the way they once did for syndication, cable, and HBO. The common denominator for all these companies isn’t simply an exchange of value, but offering new opportunities for collaboration. Success comes from exploring how to make one’s partners more valuable innovators.

Dramatically boosting an innovation ecosystem isn’t inherently expensive; a new API, a simulation tool, a training methodology, or slightly greater access to customer data are frequently all that’s necessary to seed mutual growth opportunities. But just as management isn’t leadership, innovation process improvement isn’t innovation ecosystem stewardship. Fostering an innovation ecosystem does require a culture and competence of stewardship — making the kinds of investments and improvements that aren’t just opportunistic, but reflect and respect the core values you want to endure.

How does your organization invite innovation partnerships? How do you recognize and reward innovation partners? (Of course, your answers matter less than their answers.) Similarly, how is your innovation ecosystem making participatory innovation possible?

It’s tempting, often irresistibly so, for stewards of innovation ecosystems to want to compete against customers, channels, and suppliers when lush new savannas of profitability and growth materialize. The strategic challenge becomes resisting the urge to gobble up that opportunity, and instead identifying the partnerships that would expand it even more. Indeed, innovation ecosystems triumph over innovative companies if and when the benefits of mutual value creation outweigh the costs. That, in no small part, is why Google acquired Nest and why its ecosystem is broader and deeper than Microsoft’s or Yahoo’s. In other words, if you’re not making your innovation partners richer in some measurable way, you’re simply running an innovation factory, not an ecosystem.

Again, the Googles, the Amazons, the Toyotas, and the LinkedIns know this. But does your organization mind and measure who it’s making richer and more innovative? If it doesn’t, it may not be your innovation ecosystem for long.


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New Readiness Assessment Tool from EY to Improve Innovation Capabilities

How does the new Readiness Assessment Tool help to generate more and better innovation, as well as faster and cheaper innovations that bring revenues? Apply the assessment tool to your own company to create a common understanding of what holistic innovation management means, to structure, analyze, and measure the innovation potential of your firm, identify areas of improvement, and ultimately to design and implement recommendations tailored to the unique position of the firm.
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Social innovation in dynamic environments: organising technology for temporary advantage

Social innovation in dynamic environments: organising technology for temporary advantage
Sandro Battisti
International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Vol. 2, No. 6 (2013) pp. 504 – 524
A new challenge for public-private partnerships lies in gaining temporary advantage through social innovation, in order to operate within dynamic environments. This research explores social innovation enabled by technology, in order to build an empirical model that can be useful in addressing social needs of the citizens, while increasing temporary advantages for the companies. This research presents an entrepreneurial approach in which public-private partnerships can organise technology in order to develop and diffuse social innovation within dynamic environments. By employing this model, citizens can be empowered to participate in the joint construction of social innovation enabled by information and communication technology, in particular the phenomenon of shared data. The social entrepreneurship approach enables public-private partnerships to leverage shared data and obtain temporary advantages. This aids in developing innovative solutions to improve quality of life of citizens while it enables companies to succeed in dynamic environments.

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