Open Innovation Key for Modern Local Authorities

The LocalGov website notes that open innovation has never been more apt than in the public sector right now, with the on-going pressure to improve efficiencies and services with ever-decreasing resources. The public sector must therefore be as open as possible when it comes to sourcing and capturing innovative ideas that can help address issues and improve services. This can even be within policy development, involving collaborative and dispersed groups from across a spectrum of society to collectively develop potential new policy ideas. But however it is deployed, open innovation should be at the heart of modern local government.

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Open Innovation: Getting Started

An article by Nicholas Bry on the Innovation Excellence website outlined and described a number of different open innovation processes: acceleration programs and innovation hubs; crowdsourcing and ideas contests; co-creation platforms; and codevelopments and hackathons. The article then went on to discuss a number of ideas to make open innovation successful including the role of intense dialogue and community branding; an open innovation hub; mapping the genome of collective intelligence; and the open innovation funnel.

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10 Reasons Open Innovation Can Fail

The WeThinq website noted that Open innovation can be a powerful force. When hundreds of people collaborate openly things can evolve in all kinds of creative ways. That kind of energy is fantastic to see and ideas can spread like wild fire and comments come in by the minute. Hack-a-thons, idea contests, innovation labs – there are so many forms of open innovation nowadays, but there are also many times when open innovation can fail to solve problems or attract participation. Here are 10 things NOT to do if you want your open innovation challenge to succeed.

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An organizational competence model for innovation intermediaries

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to address the role of intermediaries in open innovation networks in achieving ICT-enabled innovations. The ultimate goal of open innovation networks is to create value for endusers and providers, and to share the risks and rewards. The aim of this paper is to analyse the competences that intermediaries in open innovation networks need to master and exploit during the exploration and exploitation phases of an innovation process. Design/methodology/approach – Based on 14 cases, all of which are examples of collaborative multi-party projects with a focus on ICT-enabled innovations, the paper inductively develops a competence model for intermediaries that can be applied at different stages in the innovation. Findings – The research shows that intermediaries can play an effective role in open innovation, provided they have the right set of competences. It can be concluded that the role of innovation intermediary is most relevant in the creation and development phases. Research limitations/implications – This study certainly has its limitations. The researchers were involved in several cases, which may have biased their views, even though an external expert who was familiar with the case and the work of the intermediary was involved to minimize the risk. Most importantly, the cases all involved of a single intermediary, albeit with many different private and public partners. The cases were primarily located in the Netherlands. It would be interesting to complement this study with results from other innovation intermediaries. Practical implications – The paper identified which competences of organizations in innovation are required, and how to balance the competences between the different partners, including the innovation intermediary. The study allows to link the type of goal of the collaboration to a number of best practices, including the competences and roles that are required at different stages. Originality/value – The paper combines the core innovation competences with the innovation value chain concept developed, and evaluate the resulting model in 14 different cases. The model is new and relevant in practice.
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Henry Chesbrough Named One of Top Management Thinkers

The Thinkers50 website announced that Henry Chesbrough has been named one of the top 50 manangement thinkers in the world. The Thinkers50 program selects the top 50 management thinkers every two years, based on criteria that include the global impact of their ideas and rigor of their research. Henry Chesbrough has written extensively on the topic of innovation, but he is best known for his work on open innovation, a term that he helped popularize. An adjunct professor at the Haas School of Business, at the University of California, Berkeley, Chesbrough was shortlisted for the 2013 Thinkers50 innovation award.

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Open Innovation Comes to Namibia

The All Africa website posted an article which noted that open innovation has developed from a buzzword into an established practice of innovation management. Sources of external input for innovation are plentiful, including market actors like customers, suppliers, competitors; the scientific system of university labs and research institutions; public authorities like patent agents and public funding agencies; and mediating parties like technology consultants, media, and conference organisers. A key aspect of OI is to connect the organization with a community that can assist with ideas, networking- and other skills; and subsequently OI evolved in such a manner that successful open innovation relies on intermediaries and platforms connecting an organisation with outside solution providers, so called Open Innovation Accelerators (OIAs).

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Practical Handbook on Open Innovation

The Science Business website posted an article noting that there are several reasons why researchers should learn more about Open Innovation. Many funding agencies and universities are starting to demand the use of Open Innovation. Several companies are changing their model for R&D, creating new opportunities for research collaboration but also potential pitfalls. Open Innovation also provides lots of new tools for getting resources, changing the way research can be done and how results can be utilized. However, until now most of the literature on Open Innovation has focused on how companies and inventors can use it.

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